The Camp Mattawoman Gazette
Volume 1 No. 8 August 1999

Editor-in-Chief: Gilbert V. Riddle

Contributing Editor: Tom Fox.

Mission Statement: To provide a means for the dissemination of period information concerning the Eighth Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers and its’ members during and after the Civil War.

David Patterson:

Company E, 8th New Jersey Vols.

Rank: Corporal. Enrolled and Mustered in: August 30, 1861 [as a private]. For the period of 3 years. Remarks: Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps. Nov. 15, ‘63; discharged therefrom Sept. 1, ‘64. Promoted to Corp. Dec. 21, ‘61.

William Stryker, A.G.O. Records of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Volume I. Trenton, N.J., John L. Murphy, 1876. Page 395.

Missile Extracted from within the Cranium. -

Corporal David Patterson, Company E, 8th New Jersey Volunteers, aged 37 years, was wounded at the battle of Chancellorsville, May 3d, 1863., by a conoidal ball, which penetrated the left parietal bone. He was admitted to the Log Hospital, Chancellorsville, and on June 8th was sent to the Mower Hospital, Philadelphia. The ball had been extracted prior to admission, and several pieces of bone had come away. The pulsations of the brain were visible through the wound. During the months of June, July, August, and September, fragments of bone continued to come away, but on October 20th, the wound had healed with the exception of a small point. He had been transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps on August 20th, 1863. On September 1st, 1864, he was discharged [from] the service and pensioned. Subsequent information states that the patient’s symptoms, indicating lesions of the brain, are on the increase. His disability is rated one-half. Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part I. Volume II. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1875. Page 196.

Extract: The 8th N.J. Regt.

[Chancellorsville]

Co. E.

... David Patterson, unknown and missing ...

The Sentinel of Freedom. 5/12/63. Tuesday.

Extract: The 8th N.J. Regt.

[Chancellorsville]

Report of Enlisted men who distinguished themselves in the late Action at Chancellorsville. ...

Co. E - David Patterson, Severely wounded in the left shoulder Gallantry - behaved with great gallantry.

New Jersey State Archives. Trenton, N.J. Records Group: Dept. of Defense. Subgroup: Military Records. Series: Civil War. Box 84, Book 405, item 3.

James McDonald:

Company C, 8th New Jersey Vols.

Rank: private. Enrolled and Mustered in: Sept. 14, 1864 For the period of 1 year. Remarks: Substitute.

William Stryker, A.G.O. Records of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Volume I. Trenton, N.J., John L. Murphy, 1876. Page 381.

James McDonald:

Private James McDonald, Company C, 8th New Jersey Vols., aged 32 years, was wounded at Hatcher’s Run, Virginia, April 2d, 1865 by a conoidal ball, which entered the right side, above the crest of the ileum, and lodged in the transverse process of the first lumbar vertebra. He was taken to the field hospital of the Second Corps, and on April 5th [was] sent to Douglas Hospital, Washington. Secondary hemorrhage occurred on the 12th, which was controlled by compression. On the 14th, the ball was extracted. This man was discharged from the service on September 11th, 1865. On October 20th, he was readmitted to Douglas Hospital by order of the Medical Director. Necrosis of the transverse process of the first lumbar vertebra was diagnosed. He was transferred to Harwood Hospital on November 2d, and finally discharged from the hospital on November 9th, 1865. He was not a pensioner.

Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part I. Volume II. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1875. Pages 441-442.

William Wick /a.k.a. Wicks:

Company H, 8th New Jersey Vols.

Rank: Private. Enrolled and Mustered in: Sept. 6, 1864. For the period of 1 year. Remarks: Substitute - Discharged at De Camp U.S. Army General hospital. David’s Island, New York Harbor, Sept. 23, 1865 - Disability.

William Stryker, A.G.O. Records of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Volume I. Trenton, N.J., John L. Murphy, 1876. Page 412.

Primary Amputations in the Middle Third of the Leg for Shot Injuries.

Case No. 707 - W. Wicks, private Company H, 8th New Jersey. Age 23. Date of wound: Oct. 27, 1864. Date of Operation: Oct. 29, 1864. Operation; Right, circular. Result: Discharged: Sept. 23, 1865.

Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part III. Volume II. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1883. Page 489.

Luke Cadden/a.k.a. Caden:

Company C, 8th New Jersey Vols.

Rank: Private. Enrolled and Mustered in: August 29, 1861 [as a private]. For the period of 3 years. Remarks: Transferred to Co. A; re-enlisted Dec. 25, 1863. Mustered out July 17, 1865

William Stryker, A.G.O. Records of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Volume I. Trenton, N.J., John L. Murphy, 1876. Co. C page 383. Co. A page 369.

Case of Ligation of the Brachial Artery.

Case 14: L. Caden, private, Company C, 8th New Jersey. Age 19. Date of injury: June 16, 1864. Nature of injury: Flesh, right arm, middle. Date of hemorrhage: July 2, 1864. Probable source of hemorrhage: minor profunda. Date of operation: July 2, 1864. Operation: one end in wound. Operator: A.A. Surgeon W. Hooper. Result: Duty, January 15, 1865.

Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part III. Volume II. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1883. Page 778.

G. Butler:

Company ?, 8th New Jersey Vols.

Rank: Private. Enrolled and Mustered in: For the period of years. Remarks:

William Stryker, A.G.O. Records of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Volume I. Trenton, N.J., John L. Murphy, 1876. Page ?.

Primary Amputation at the Knee Joint for Shot Fracture.

Case No. 57 - G. Butler, private, Company C, 8th New Jersey. Age: 19. Date of Injury: August 16, 1864. Fracture of left leg by a fragment of shell. Operation: Amputation at the knee joint. Result: Died November 22, 1864, chronic diarrhea.

Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part III. Volume II. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1883. Page 402.

Jacob Opperman:

Company E, 8th New Jersey Vols.

Rank: Private. Enrolled and Mustered in: August 30, 1861. For the period of 3 years. Remarks: Died at U.S. Army General Hospital, Fredericksburg, Va., May 15, ‘64, of wounds received in action at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. William Stryker, A.G.O. Records of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Volume I. Trenton, N.J., John L. Murphy, 1876. Page 396.

Case 88: J. Opperman, private, Company E, 8th New Jersey. Age 19. Date of injury: May 5, 1864. Nature of Injury: conoidal ball fracture of left knee joint. Date of Operation: On field, May 5, 1864. Operation: Amputation by Surg. N. Hayward., 20th Mass. Result: Bone removed. Died May 15, 1864.

Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part III. Volume II. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1883. Page 403.

Francis W. Harney:

Company B, 8th New Jersey Vols.

Rank: Private. Enrolled and Mustered in: August 8, 1864. For the period of 3 years. Mustered out: June 16, ‘65. Remarks: Substitute - Discharged at Washington, D.C., G.O. 77, Par. 6, War Dept. A.G.O., Washington, D.C., April 28, 1865.

William Stryker, A.G.O. Records of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Volume I. Trenton, N.J., John L. Murphy, 1876. Page 375.

Intermediate Amputation in the Middle Third of the femur for Shot Injury.

Case 79 - F.W. Harney, private, Company B, 8th New Jersey. Age: 18. Dates: Oct. 27-30, 1864. Operation: right circular. Operator: Surgeon Pope, C.S.A. Result: Discharged June 18, 1865.

Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part III. Volume II. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1883. Page 281.

Incised wounds of the Knee Joint: surgeon. A.J. McKelway, 8th N.J., certified that the disability was caused by a wound made with an axe in February, 1862, which laid open the joint. Private W. Trahey ... 71st New York was discharged from the service May 31, 1862 by reason of lameness and partial anchylosis of the knee joint.

Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part III. Volume II. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1883. Page 361.

Head Quarters Army of the Potomac. March 15th, 1864.

Special Orders No. 67}

VI. The following named Officers having tendered their resignations are honorably discharged [from] the Military Service of the United States.

Asst. Surgeon H.G. Taylor

8th N.J. Volunteers.

Ground of acceptance; being represented by the Medical Director of the 3rd corps, as in too feeble health to endure another campaign.

By command of Major General Meade [signed] S. William’s, Asst. Adjt. Genl.

New Jersey State Archives. Records Group: Dept. of Defense. Subgroup: Military Records. Series: Civil War. Box 84, Book 403, item #44.

Charles P. Lee:

Company C, 8th New Jersey Vols.

Rank: Private. Enrolled and Mustered in: Sept. 5, 1861 [Co. H]. For the period of 3 years. Remarks: Discharged at U.S. Army Gen. Hosp., Alexandria, Va., March 19, 1865 - Wounds received in action at Wilderness, Va., leg amputated; transferred from Co. H. Transferred to Co. C; re-enlisted Dec. 25, 1863. William Stryker, A.G.O. Records of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Volume I. Trenton, N.J., John L. Murphy, 1876. Co. C page 382. Co. H page 413.

Primary Amputations in the Upper Third of the Leg for Shot Injuries.

Case 376: C.P. Lee, private, Company H, 8th New Jersey. Age 21. Date of injury: May 5, 1864. Date of Operation: May 6, 1864. Operation: left; flap. Result: Discharged Sept. 12, 1864. Died May 18, 1867.

Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part III. Volume II. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1883. Page 470.

[Unable to locate the following individual in Stryker under the 8th New Jersey.]

Case 381: E.C. Lewis, private, Company K, 8th New Jersey. Age 18. Date of injury: April 2, 1865. Date of Operation: April 2, 1865. Operation: Right circular. Result: Discharged Nov. 4, 1865. Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part III. Volume II. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1883. Page 470.

John Fitzpatrick:

Company F, 8th New Jersey Vols.

Rank: Private. Enrolled and Mustered in: Mar. 20, 1865. For the period of 1 year. Remarks: Substitute - Absent in U.S. Army Gen. Hosp., Newark, N.J.; wounded April 2, 1865. William Stryker, A.G.O. Records of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Volume I. Trenton, N.J., John L. Murphy, 1876. Page 402.

Primary Amputations in the Lower Third of the Femur for shot Fractures.

Case 281: J. Fitzpatrick, private, Company F, 8th New Jersey. Age 23. Date of injury: April 2, 1865. [Date of Operation: Not specified.] Operation: Left. Result: Mustered out July 28, 1865. Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part III. Volume II. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1883. Page 248.

Henry Martin:

Company H, 8th New Jersey Vols.

Rank: Private. Enrolled and Mustered in: June 29, 1864. For the period of 3 years. Mustered out: August 18, 1865. Remarks: Substitute - Discharged S.O. 446 Par. 21, War Dept., A.G.O., Washington, D.C.; leg amputated. William Stryker, A.G.O. Records of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Volume I. Trenton, N.J., John L. Murphy, 1876. Page 410.

Case 542: H. Martin, private, Company H, 8th New Jersey. Age 23. Date of injury: March 31, 1865. Date of Operation: April 1, 1865. Operation: Left circular. Operator: Surgeon H.F. Lyster, 5th Mich. Result: Discharged Sept. 8, 1865. Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part III. Volume II. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1883. Page 251.

William Terry:

Company G, 8th New Jersey Vols.

Rank: Private. Enrolled and Mustered in: Jan. 26, 1864. For the period of 3 years. Remarks: Recruit - discharged at U.S. Army Gen. Hosp., York, Pa., June 28, 1865 - Wounds received in action; left thigh amputated; transferred from Co. D, 6th Regt.

William Stryker, A.G.O. Records of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Volume I. Trenton, N.J., John L. Murphy, 1876. Page 406.

Case 858: W. Terry, private, Company G, 8th New Jersey. Age 19. Date of injury: Oct. 7, 1864. [Date of Operation: Not specified.] Operation: Left circular. Operator: A. Surg. - Johnson C.S.A., April 14, 1865 re-amputation - mid third. Discharged June 28, 1865. Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part III. Volume II. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1883. Page 255.

James H. Silsbe, a.k.a. Silsbee:

Company C, 8th New Jersey Vols.

Rank: Private. Enrolled and Mustered in: August 29, 1861. For the period of 3 years. Remarks: Discharged at Ward Gen. Hosp., Newark, N.J., May 6, 1864 - Disability.

William Stryker, A.G.O. Records of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Volume I. Trenton, N.J., John L. Murphy, 1876. Page 382.

Secondary Amputation in the Lower Third of the Femur for Shot Fracture. Case 85: J.H. Silsbee, private, [Company C,] 8th New Jersey. Age 27. Date of injury: May 3, 1863. [Date of Operation:] June 18, 1863. Operation: Left circular. [Operator:] A.A. Surgeon W.S. Ward. Re-amputation - August 5, 1863. Result: Discharged May 6, 1864. Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part III. Volume II. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1883. Page 321.

Extract from the Report of Surgeon Alexander J. McKelway, 8th New Jersey Volunteers. Camp near Alexandria, Virginia, October 15, 1862.

The 8th regiment of New Jersey volunteers was mustered into the service of the United States at Trenton, New Jersey, August 29, 1861. It remained in that vicinity until October 1st, receiving recruits until it numbered about nine hundred men. We arrived at Washington, D.C., October 2d, and encamped on the evening of the same day on Meridian Hill, where we remained until December 1st. The camp-site was all that could be desired for elevation, purity of air, and facility for drainage, and yet, from changes in their habits of life and difference of water and climate, the men suffered severely from diarrhea. Several cases of dysentery of grave character occurred, also typhoid fever to some extent, together with three cases of variola.

It seems worthy of note that quinine, combined with the astringents and mercurials, given in diarrhea or dysentery, was thought to be beneficial in some cases of an obstinate character. In this connection, it may be remarked that during the month of October the weather was unusually warm, and to those who, in a more northern latitude, had never at that season of the year been subjected to such a degree of heat; very oppressive; also that malaria had much to do in producing the obstinacy of the cases of disease which have been referred to.

November 30, 1861, we moved to Budd’s Ferry, Maryland, landing at the mouth of Mattawoman creek, and on the third day after en- camped in a pine forest, which was our resting place for the winter. The soil of the camp was a sandy loam, with tough clay subsoil, retaining water in large quantities, while between the encampment and the Potomac river a large marsh intervened. During the month of December acute and chronic rheumatism and diarrhea were the prevalent diseases, induced by exposure on picket duty, which had to be continued during the whole winter.

During the latter part of the month of February and through the month of March rubeola prevailed in the regiment to the extent of thirty cases. Although the disease was of a severe type, yet none of the cases died, but some of them were followed by tuberculosis and bronchitis, which caused the discharge of several men. During these months typhoid fever and typhoid-pneumonia prevailed to a considerable extent, and were of a grave and severe type. Four deaths occurred from these last mentioned forms of disease.

As the weather became warmer the effect of malaria became visible in the prevalence of intermittent fevers, which, however, yielded readily to treatment. On April 5th we embarked for the Peninsula, leaving thirty-five men in the hospital of Hooker’s division at Budd’s Ferry. To this hospital there were sent from this regiment, as well as from the whole division, many debilitated from the effects of rubeola, and typhoid disease, many afflicted with intermittent, remittent, and typhoid fevers, the victims of chronic rheumatism, and those who were broken down and infirm, numbering in all five hundred and twenty men from a division of fourteen thousand. The passage occupied seven days. The men, crowded on transports, suffered much from the inclemency of the weather and from the bad quality of the water furnished them. Diarrhea made its appearance in a large number of cases previous to landing on the 12th of April at Ship Point, Virginia, from whence the regiment next day marched to Yorktown. Here the encampment was crowded in consequence of the large number of troops occupying the ground. Water was procured with difficulty, owing to its great depth from the surface; constant exposure on duty taxing the energies of the men to the utmost; digging trenches amid rain and storm, and the performance of picket duty, told with fearful effect upon their health. Men never worked harder than they did from the time of their landing until May 4th. Diarrhea, camp dysentery, remittent and intermittent fevers, as well as typhoid fever of grave type, made their appearance. The sick list averaged from one hundred to one hundred and twenty daily. There were two deaths from dysentery and one from typhoid fever. More than sixty men were sent to general hospital. On landing at Yorktown the command had numbered eight hundred and forty-five men.

May 4th, the regiment took up its line of march for Williamsburg. The roads were horrible, the mud being knee deep, and the march which was continued until 12 o’clock p.m., was resumed at 4 o’clock on the morning of the 5th. This was severely felt by men who had eaten nothing since the previous day, and who had lain in the mud during the four hours allowed them for rest. Without breakfast they were brought into action, and did their part faithfully during seven hours.

The mean strength of the regiment in this action was six hundred all told, and its loss was one commissioned officer killed, eleven wounded; enlisted men, thirty-four killed, one hundred and fifty-eight wounded - total, two hundred and seven. As soon as the wounded were attended to (no amputations being necessary) they were shipped to various hospitals from Briar Creek Landing.

The regiment encamped near the battle-field until May 11th. The long continued rains had rendered the site of the camp almost a marsh, and the diseases which had prevailed at Yorktown were aggravated in frequency and intensity. On the 11th the march was resumed. The regiment remained for three days at Burnsville, and then advanced, passing by Slatersville, New Kent Court-House, Cumberland, and Baltimore Cross Roads, to Bottom’s Bridge. This march to Fair Oaks, which was reached on May 26th, was performed amid a constant rainstorm and over roads rendered almost impassable by mud. Dysentery, diarrhea, intermittent and remittent fevers were the attendants of the regiment, and many cases of these diseases were sent to the transports at West Point. On the 31st this regiment, together with the 7th New Jersey, was detailed to guard the railroad bridge, rifle-pits, &c., near Bottom’s Bridge, the remainder of the brigade being engaged in the battle of Fair Oaks. The aggregate strength of the regiment here was about four hundred men. In a few days the regiment rejoined the division at Fair Oaks and did duty in the advance. The duty was harassing and exhausting; on picket one day, and at work on fortifications and in trenches knee- deep in water the next day. The enemy was close in front and firing between the pickets constant, preventing men from securing necessary repose. The encampment was a perfect graveyard. Within the lines the dead were unburied; lying on the surface of the ground with but a sprinkling of earth thrown on them, while immediately without the dead bodies of men and horses were quite exposed or but slightly covered with brush. Just outside the camp the bodies of thirty dead rebels were one day counted by an officer of this regiment, whose attention was directed to their place of sepulcher by their feet projecting from beneath the brush thrown over them. Here the suffering of the men from the want of water suitable for drinking was terrible. Efforts to dig wells (one forty-five feet deep was dug) only resulted in procuring water still more unfit for use than nearer the surface. The air was filled with a most horrible stench, arising from the putrefaction of dead bodies on every side. As might be expected from such a combination of evils, the health of the men rapidly deteriorated. Fevers of the types before prevalent increased in intensity and numbers; diarrhea and dysentery became more rife; and several cases of coup de soliel occurred, occasioned by exposure to the sun’s rays during the intense heat of that period.

The regiment remained at Fair Oaks four weeks, during which time from seventy-five to one hundred men were lost to it by sickness and death. One commissioned officer and two privates were killed on picket duty, and ten privates wounded. Every few days a number of broken down and diseased men were sent to general hospital at White House, where six of them died. The health among the survivors of those sent to hospital was, in a large number of instances, so seriously impaired as to render them totally unfit for duty, while the seeds of disease planted in the swamps of the Chickahominy developed themselves among those remaining with the regiment for weeks afterward.

On Saturday, June28th, the order was given for the army to retreat. On that day this regiment was on picket duty, and remained where it was till noon of the 29th, when it commenced gradually retiring along the Charles City road until it reached the cross roads of the same name, some fifteen miles from Fair Oaks, the rear guard constantly skirmishing with the enemy. During the seven days’ fight, while the army continued its retreat, this regiment, though equally exposed with the rest sustained no casualties. Some thirty-five men, belonging to it, who were left in the hospitals at Savage Station, Bottom’s Bridge, and White House, were taken prisoners by the enemy. July 3d, the army reached Harrison’s Landing.

Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General, United States Army. The
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (1861-1865). Part II. Volume I. Surgical History. Washington, Government Printing Office. 1879. Pages 75-76.

Hospital -

At 9 o’clock last evening [August 10, 1863] the hospital steamer Thomas P. Way, landed 80 wounded soldiers at the Hospital in this city [Newark], from Forts Schuyler and Wood, among whom were the following belonging to Jersey Regiments: ...

Eighth - Michael Pigney, Co. I, [not listed in Co I per Stryker] John W. DeHart, Co. H.

Sentinel of Freedom. Tuesday, August 11, 1863.